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Tables of Contents for Problem-Based Learning
Chapter/Section Title
Page #
Page Count
Contributors
vii
 
Introduction
1
12
THE CASE STUDIES
Section 1: Political, Administrative and Resource Issues
Come and See the Real Thing
13
7
David Prideaux
Bren Gannon
Elizabeth Farmer
Sue Runciman
Isobel Rolfe
Convincing faculty members to accept a proposal to adopt Problem-based learning (PBL) within a curriculum
No Money Where Your Mouth Is
20
7
Nina Felice Schor
Resource intensity of PBL; obtaining faculty tutors in the face of competing demands
Into the Lion's Den
27
7
Amy Blue
Introducing PBL into a combined clinical teaching attachment; dealing with organizational difficulties
Lost in the Melee
34
6
D Christopher Clark
Converting a traditional curriculum to a `hybrid' PBL curriculum; reducing `overload' in the curriculum
But What if They Leave with Misinformation?
40
5
Gwendie Camp
Convincing sceptical faculty about `self-correction' mechanisms in PBL groups
Mixed Models and Mixed Messages
45
7
Marilyn S. Lantz
John F Chaves
Implementing PBL during periods of administrative transition; dealing with challenges facing students in a new curriculum in which only some courses use PBL
Overcoming Obstacles
52
8
Ann Sefton
Achieving a vertically integrated PBL curriculum in a traditional, departmentally organized medical school
Forward from the Retreat
60
11
Peter Schwartz
Acting on a proposal to introduce PBL into a long-established, traditional medical curriculum
Section 2: Issues Relating to Teachers
Too Little, Too Late?
71
7
Carol-Ann Courneya
The importance of group-and self-evaluation and timely feedback in PBL tutorials
Not More PBL
78
5
Elizabeth Farmer
Responding to clinical students' boredom with paper-based PBL
Why Do They Ignore It?
83
7
Marlene Lindberg
Gordon Greene
Getting students in a PBL curriculum to pay attention to important learning issues that do not appear to them to be central
Redesigning PBL: Resolving the Integration Problem
90
8
Barry Maitland
Rob Cowdroy
Translating a PBL model from one discipline to another; getting students to integrate knowledge and learning in a PBL course
Why Does the Department Have Professors if They Don't Teach?
98
6
Barbara Miflin
David Price
Confusion about the meaning of `self-directed learning' -- addressing the confusion and minimizing its effects when implementing PBL
Faculty Development Workshops: A `Challenge' of Problem-Based Learning?
104
7
Deborah E Allen
Barbara J Duch
Susan E Groh
Dealing with difficulties during faculty development workshops on PBL resulting from participants' different backgrounds and expectations
The Students Did That?
111
8
David Taylor
Inducting faculty members and students into a new PBL curriculum
Section 3: Issues Relating to Students
Mature Students?
119
7
Emyr W Benbow
Ray F T McMahon
Difficulties in PBL process when `mature' students take control of groups
To Admit or Not to Admit? That Is the Question
126
9
Chuck Shuler
Alan Fincham
Selecting students for PBL programmes; reconciling differing views among students of the nature and goals of PBL
Why Aren't They Working?
135
7
Diana Dolmans
Ineke Wolfhagen
Cees van der Vleuten
Responding to poorly functioning tutorial groups in PBL
I Don't Want to Be a Groupie
142
7
David M Kaufman
Karen V Mann
Dealing with a student who fails a PBL unit because of poor participation in the group
Reflecting on Assessment
149
7
Jan Lovie-Kitchin
Choosing a method that assesses both the knowledge gained and the learning process of PBL
Assessable Damage
156
7
Alex Forrest
Laurie Walsh
Dealing with factors causing a student's hostile reaction to assessment in a PBL course
They Just Don't Pull Their Weight
163
8
Don Woods
Assuring individual accountability of students in small tutorless PBL groups
Conclusion
171
6
Further Reading
177
3
Index
180