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Tables of Contents for Key Account Management
Chapter/Section Title
Page #
Page Count
Preface
ix
 
Foreword
xi
 
Acknowledgements
xiii
 
And it was all going so very well...
1
4
PART I DEFINING KEY ACCOUNT MANAGEMENT
What is a key account?
5
4
So, what is the right answer?
6
1
The key account `investment'
7
1
Why key account? A justification
8
1
Managing the future
9
4
The importance of balance
10
2
Guessing the future -- certainty or drift?
12
1
How fast do we expect the future to arrive?
12
1
Assessing the opportunity
13
9
A secure future through competitive advantage?
16
1
When customers `snap'
17
2
Understanding the market chain and where you sit
19
2
Long-term competitive advantage?
21
1
Key account management -- its purpose
22
6
Sales and business objectives
23
1
Sanity checks
24
1
Implications of KAM
25
1
So, what will KAM `feel' like?
26
2
Developing the relationship
28
16
The key account relationship development model
29
5
Some pros and cons of each stage
34
7
Some things to watch out for
41
1
Avoiding frustration
42
2
The good, the bad, the sad and the ugly
44
8
The bad story
44
2
The sad story
46
1
The ugly story
47
1
The good story
48
4
KAM profitability
52
13
Will KAM be profitable?
53
12
PART II THE CUSTOMER'S PERSPECTIVE
Purchasing professionals
65
11
The purchasing `revolution'
66
1
Supply chain management
67
2
Supply side management
69
3
Spend intelligence
72
2
Purchasing strategy
74
2
Supplier positioning -- becoming a key supplier
76
12
Supplier positioning models
76
1
The risk/significance/spend model
77
5
What relationships, what activities?
82
3
So, who's the key supplier?
85
1
Is there any escape for suppliers?
86
2
Measuring value
88
7
The risk/significance/value model
91
1
Open book trading
92
3
Measuring trust
95
4
The risk/significance/trust model
96
3
Supply base optimization
99
5
Reducing supplier numbers
99
3
Developing suppliers' capabilities
102
2
Culture and values -- becoming a strategic supplier
104
15
What to sell and where? The Ansoff matrix and risk
106
4
Why will people buy? Porter and competitive advantage
110
2
What makes your business hum? Treacy and Weirsema's business value drivers
112
7
PART III PREPARING FOR KEY ACCOUNT MANAGEMENT
What will it take? Goals and obstacles
119
3
Goals
119
1
Obstacles
120
2
What will it take? Skills
122
5
Attitudes and behaviours
124
3
What will it take? Systems and processes
127
9
Information systems
128
1
Operational systems and processes
129
1
Performance measurement systems
130
2
Communication systems
132
1
Knowledge management
133
3
What will it take? Organization and resources
136
10
Organization
136
5
Human resources
141
5
What will it take? Making it happen
146
9
Alignment and managing the change
147
1
The change equation
147
3
Critical success factors (CSFs)
150
5
PART IV IDENTIFYING KEY ACCOUNTS
Segmentation
155
13
What is segmentation?
157
2
Methods for segmentation
159
1
Market mapping
159
2
Who buys what, how, when and where?
161
2
Making the cut
163
2
Segmentation and KAM identification
165
1
Benefits of segmentation for KAM
166
1
A new type of marketing plan? KAM and relationship marketing
167
1
Identifying your key accounts
168
19
An identification and selection process
169
3
Is all this really necessary?
172
3
The perfect investment portfolio?
175
1
The selection factors and the selection process
176
3
The selection process
179
2
How much effort and how much detail?
181
1
Key accounts and multiple business unit suppliers
182
5
PART V ENTRY STRATEGIES
The customer's decision-making process
187
3
The buying decision process
188
2
Selling to the organization -- the DMU
190
25
DMU -- the decision-making unit
190
2
Interests and influences -- entry strategies
192
1
The buyer's role
192
5
Other interests and influences
197
5
Levels of seniority
202
1
Entry strategies
203
1
The contact matrix
204
2
Contacts over time
206
2
Avecia -- a live application
208
7
PART VI MEETING THE CUSTOMER'S NEEDS
Meeting the business needs -- beyond benefits
215
8
Where are you with your customers?
216
4
The customer's total business experience
220
3
Positive impact analysis (PIA)
223
8
Screening and selecting positive impact activities
224
3
Some hints on using positive impact analysis
227
3
Gaining advantage or avoiding disadvantage?
230
1
Electronic commerce
231
10
Electronic commerce -- threat or solution?
232
1
Electronic commerce and supplier positioning
233
1
Getting into e-commerce
234
1
Forms of e-commerce
235
6
Making the proposal
241
5
Open to change?
242
1
Proposal analysis
243
3
Selling to the individual
246
7
Logic or emotion?
247
1
Ensuring rapport
248
5
PART VII KEEPING ON TRACK
Getting there -- timetables and performance
253
7
Timetables for implementation
254
1
Training development tracks
255
2
Regular health checks
257
3
Writing the key account plan
260
6
Some `must haves'
261
2
A few tips
263
1
A sample running order
264
2
Getting further help
266
1
References and further reading
267
2
Index
269