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Tables of Contents for International Political Economy and Mass Communication in Chile
Chapter/Section Title
Page #
Page Count
Foreword: Hegemony, Culture and Imperialism
vii
 
Stephen Gill
Preface
xiii
 
List of Abbreviations and Acronyms
xvi
 
Map of Chile
xvii
 
Introduction
1
35
Intellectuals in Transition in the Global Political Economy: How Donald Duck and the Teenage Mutant Ninja Turtles Won in Chile
1
3
Domination and Communication in International Relations
4
6
Transnational Hegemony
10
6
Cultural Imperialism
16
6
Culture and Hegemony
22
6
The Social Constitution of the Intellectuals
28
8
Origins of the Scientific Study of Mass Communications in Chile: 1958--67
36
25
Modernization and International Relations
36
2
US Goals and the `Alliance for Progress'
38
7
Harmonizing Chilean Politics and US Goals
45
4
Mass Communications Scholarship in Chile
49
12
Challenges to the Chilean Regime and Critical Mass Communication Studies: 1967--73
61
48
The University Reform Movement
64
6
The New Institutional Spaces in the Intellectual Field
70
3
CEREN: Ideology and Dependency
73
10
Unidad Popular: Communication in the Struggle for Socialism
83
7
Reaction: The Right Reorganizes
90
4
International Dimensions of the Reaction
94
5
Popular Communication Initiatives under Unidad Popular
99
5
Another Form of Scholarship Under the UP: the EAC
104
5
Repression and Resistance: 1973-90
109
41
From National Security to Neoliberalism
111
2
The Creation of Private Research Centres
113
3
The Private Research Institutes and the Field of Communications
116
3
The Communications System under the Dictatorship
119
6
The Media in the Authoritarian Communication System
125
13
`Alternative' and `Popular' Communications
138
7
The Political and Professional Effects of Military Rule on Communications Scholarship
145
5
Conclusion: Present and Future in Chilean Communications Studies
150
19
The Role of the Media After the Transition
157
4
Political Agency in Chile After the Transition: Hegemony and the Possibility of Counter-hegemony
161
8
Notes
169
11
Bibliography
180
20
Index
200