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Ilya Somin has written 3 work(s)
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Cover for 9780226256603 Cover for 9780387559087 Cover for 9780226422169 Cover for 9780804786089 Cover for 9780804798037 Cover for 9780804786614 Cover for 9780804799317 Cover for 9781560002741
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In 2005, the Supreme Court ruled that the city of New London, Connecticut, could condemn fifteen residential properties in order to transfer them to a new private owner. Although the Fifth Amendment only permits the taking of private property for  "public use," the Court ruled that the transfer of condemned land to private parties for "economic development" is permitted by the Constitution - even if the government cannot prove that the expected development will ever actually happen. The Court's decision in Kelo v. City of New London empowered the grasping hand of the state at the expense of the invisible hand of the market.        In this detailed study of one of the most controversial Supreme Court cases in modern times, Ilya Somin argues that Kelo was a grave error. Economic development and "blight" condemnations are unconstitutional under both originalist and most "living constitution" theories of legal interpretation. They also victimize the poor and the politically weak for the benefit of powerful interest groups, and often destroy more economic value than they create. Kelo itself exemplifies these patterns. The residents targeted for condemnation lacked the influence needed to combat the formidable government and corporate interests arrayed against them.  Moreover, the city's poorly conceived development plan ultimately failed: the condemned land lies empty to this day, occupied only by feral cats.   The Supreme Court's unpopular ruling triggered an unprecedented political reaction, with forty-five states passing new laws intended to limit the use of eminent domain. But many of the new laws impose few or no genuine constraints on takings. The Kelo backlash led to significant progress, but not nearly as much as it may have seemed.   Despite its outcome, the closely divided 5-4 ruling shattered what many believed to be a consensus that virtually any condemnation qualifies as a public use under the Fifth Amendment. It also showed that there is widespread public opposition to eminent domain abuse. With controversy over takings sure to continue, The Grasping Hand offers the first book-length analysis of Kelo by a legal scholar, alongside a broader history of the dispute over public use and eminent domain, and an evaluation of options for reform.

Hardcover:

9780226256603 | Univ of Chicago Pr, May 28, 2015, cover price $30.00 | About this edition: In 2005, the Supreme Court ruled that the city of New London, Connecticut, could condemn fifteen residential properties in order to transfer them to a new private owner.
9780387559087, titled "Cytochrome P450" | Springer Verlag, February 1, 1993, cover price $398.00 | also contains Cytochrome P450

Paperback:

9780226422169, titled "The Grasping Hand: "Kelo V. City of New London" and the Limits of Eminent Domain" | Reprint edition (Univ of Chicago Pr, November 23, 2016), cover price $20.00

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One of the biggest problems with modern democracy is that most of the public is usually ignorant of politics and government. Often, many people understand that their votes are unlikely to change the outcome of an election and don't see the point in learning much about politics. This may be rational, but it creates a nation of people with little political knowledge and little ability to objectively evaluate what they do know.In Democracy and Political Ignorance, Ilya Somin mines the depths of ignorance in America and reveals the extent to which it is a major problem for democracy. Somin weighs various options for solving this problem, arguing that political ignorance is best mitigated and its effects lessened by decentralizing and limiting government. Somin provocatively argues that people make better decisions when they choose what to purchase in the market or which state or local government to live under, than when they vote at the ballot box, because they have stronger incentives to acquire relevant information and to use it wisely.

Hardcover:

9780804798037 | 2 edition (Stanford Law & Politics, June 15, 2016), cover price $90.00
9780804786089 | Stanford Law & Politics, October 2, 2013, cover price $90.00

Paperback:

9780804799317 | 2 edition (Stanford Law & Politics, June 15, 2016), cover price $27.95
9780804786614 | Stanford Law & Politics, October 2, 2013, cover price $27.95 | About this edition: One of the biggest problems with modern democracy is that most of the public is usually ignorant of politics and government.

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Product Description: The triumph of the Bolsheviks in the Russian Civil War was the first great crack in the system of international relations established by the victorious Allies. The presence of a powerful anti-Western Soviet regime not only undermined the liberal values binding the signatories and member states of the Versailles Treaty and the League of Nations, but also helped to stimulate the rise of aggressive fascist dictatorships in Germany and Italy...read more

Hardcover:

9781560002741 | Transaction Pub, August 1, 1996, cover price $40.95 | About this edition: The triumph of the Bolsheviks in the Russian Civil War was the first great crack in the system of international relations established by the victorious Allies.

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