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Marc Van De Mieroop has written 2 work(s)
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cover image for 9781444332209
Product Description: The Eastern Mediterranean in the Age of Ramesses II offers a transnational perspective on the age of King Ramesses II of Egypt during the centuries of 1500 to 1200 BC.Shows how powerful states - stretching from western Iran to Greece and from Turkey to Sudan - jointly shaped the history, society, and culture of this region through both peaceful and military meansOffers a straightforward narrative, current research, and rich illustrationsUtilizes historical data from ancient Egyptians, Babylonians, Hittites, Mycenaeans, Canaanites, and othersConsiders all members of these ancient societies, from commoners to royalty - exploring everything from people’s eating habits to royal negotiations over diplomatic marriage...read more

Paperback:

9781444332209 | Blackwell Pub, December 9, 2009, cover price $52.95 | About this edition: The Eastern Mediterranean in the Age of Ramesses II offers a transnational perspective on the age of King Ramesses II of Egypt during the centuries of 1500 to 1200 BC.

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Product Description: As the first known system of writing, the cuneiform symbols traced in Sumerian clay more than six millennia ago were once regarded as a simplistic and clumsy attempt to record in linear form the sounds of a spoken language. More recently, scholars have acknowledged that early Sumerian writing—far from being a primitive and flawed mechanism that would be "improved" by the Phoenicians and Greeks—in fact represented a complete written language system, not only meeting the daily needs of economic and government administration, but also providing a new means of understanding the world...read more

Paperback:

9780801887574 | Johns Hopkins Univ Pr, October 18, 2007, cover price $25.00 | About this edition: As the first known system of writing, the cuneiform symbols traced in Sumerian clay more than six millennia ago were once regarded as a simplistic and clumsy attempt to record in linear form the sounds of a spoken language.

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