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Vivian Bickford-Smith has written 5 work(s)
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Cover for 9781907317859 Cover for 9780864866561 Cover for 9780821417478 Cover for 9780521472036 Cover for 9780521526395
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Product Description: People Apart: 1950s Cape Town Revisited offers a rich and fascinating insight into South Africa at the brink of the apartheid through Bryan Heseltine’s previously unpublished photography of the 1940s and 50s. The photographs offer a unique glimpse into the lives of South Africans who would feel the full force of apartheid through the 1950s and beyond, showing some of the dreadful housing conditions that existed on the periphery of the city, but also testifying to the vibrancy of social and cultural life, including the work of street craftsmen, beer brewing, music and dance...read more
By Vivian Bickford-Smith (contributor), Sean Field (contributor), Bryan Heseltine (photographer), Amanda Hopkinson (foreword by) and Darren Newbury

Paperback:

9781907317859 | Black Dog Pub Ltd, June 11, 2013, cover price $29.95 | About this edition: People Apart: 1950s Cape Town Revisited offers a rich and fascinating insight into South Africa at the brink of the apartheid through Bryan Heseltine’s previously unpublished photography of the 1940s and 50s.

cover image for 9780864866561
Product Description: This richly illustrated history of Cape Town under Dutch and British rule tells the story of its residents, the world they inhabited and the city they made - beginning in the seventeenth century with the tiny Dutch settlement, hemmed in by mountains and looking out to sea, and ending with the well-established British colonial city, poised confidently on the threshold of the twentieth century...read more

Paperback:

9780864866561 | David Phillip Pub, September 15, 2011, cover price $58.95 | About this edition: This richly illustrated history of Cape Town under Dutch and British rule tells the story of its residents, the world they inhabited and the city they made - beginning in the seventeenth century with the tiny Dutch settlement, hemmed in by mountains and looking out to sea, and ending with the well-established British colonial city, poised confidently on the threshold of the twentieth century.

cover image for 9780821417478
Product Description: Black and White in Colour: African History on Screen considers how the African past has been represented in a wide range of historical films. Written by a team of eminent international scholars, the volume provides extensive coverage of both place and time and deals with major issues in the written history of Africa...read more
By Vivian Bickford-Smith (editor) and Richard Mendelsohn (editor)

Paperback:

9780821417478 | Ohio Univ Pr, March 13, 2007, cover price $32.95 | About this edition: Black and White in Colour: African History on Screen considers how the African past has been represented in a wide range of historical films.

Paperback:

9781770130579, titled "Black and White in Colour: Portraying Africa’s History on Screen" | Double Storey, January 1, 2007, cover price $34.95

cover image for 9780521526395
Product Description: Nineteenth-century Cape Town, the capital of the British Cape Colony, was conventionally regarded as a liberal oasis in an otherwise racist South Africa. Longstanding British influence was thought to mitigate the racism of the Dutch settlers and foster the development of a sophisticated and colour-blind English merchant class...read more (view table of contents, read Amazon.com's description)

Hardcover:

9780521472036 | Cambridge Univ Pr, June 1, 1995, cover price $99.99 | About this edition: Nineteenth-century Cape Town, the capital of the British Cape Colony, was conventionally regarded as a liberal oasis in an otherwise racist South Africa.

Paperback:

9780521526395 | Cambridge Univ Pr, January 1, 2004, cover price $54.99 | About this edition: Nineteenth-century Cape Town, the capital of the British Cape Colony, was conventionally regarded as a liberal oasis in an otherwise racist South Africa.

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